Arts

Art Exhibit: Intrigued at the IMC

The IMC Gallery is excited to collaborate with the Arts of Life to present a group show curated by artist Tim Stone, of the Chicago Studio. The Arts of Life is a studio based community for adults with developmental disabilities.

Intrigued reflects both the maker and viewer in their approach to artwork.  During the creative process, artists experience fascination, maybe even fixation, on a particular idea or image.  After hours of making and re-making, their idea becomes a reality of paper, paint, collage, and canvas.  Once completed, they often hope to share that feeling with viewers through their art; to inspire that same curiosity.  

Works selected for this show represent a wide variety of creative practices and styles.  Its makers are part of an artist collective that promotes the exchange of skills and concepts. The Arts of Life creates a space where the unique identity of each member is integrated and included in the whole.

Intrigued at the IMC

The IMC Gallery is excited to collaborate with the Arts of Life to present a group show curated by artist Tim Stone, of the Chicago Studio. The Arts of Life is a studio based community for adults with developmental disabilities.

 

Intrigued reflects both the maker and viewer in their approach to artwork.  During the creative process, artists experience fascination, maybe even fixation, on a particular idea or image.  After hours of making and re-making, their idea becomes a reality of paper, paint, collage, and canvas.  Once completed, they often hope to share that feeling with viewers through their art; to inspire that same curiosity.  

 

Works selected for this show represent a wide variety of creative practices and styles.  Its makers are part of an artist collective that promotes the exchange of skills and concepts. The Arts of Life creates a space where the unique identity of each member is integrated and included in the whole.

Speaking from diverse creative and personal perspectives, Intrigued aspires to captivate and connect with viewers on many levels.

 

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July 18: Artist and Writer Talks at the IMC: Jason Patterson & Brian Dolinar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exploring African American History, In Illinois & Throughout The United States

Obama Urges F.C.C. to Adopt Strict Rules on Net Neutrality

by Michael D. Shear and Edward Wyatt

WASHINGTON — President Obama on Monday put the full weight of his administration behind an open and free Internet, calling for a strict policy of so-called net neutrality and formally opposing deals in which content providers like Netflix would pay huge sums to broadband companies for faster access to their customers.

Beyond the CSA: Four Ways Communities Support Everything From Books to Beer

You know the model: Consumers purchase a share of the season’s harvest upfront and get a box of fresh produce each week from the farm. Now you can get your medicine that way too.

by Dana Drugmand

Since the first community supported agriculture program was established in western Massachusetts in the 1980s, the concept of buying food directly from local farms has taken off. There are now thousands of CSAs across the country. It’s a simple enough model—consumers purchase a share of the season’s harvest upfront, and they get a box or bag of fresh, locally grown produce each week from the farm.

And this model is not restricted to farming. In recent years, people have applied the CSA idea to other types of goods and services such as dining out, microbrews, and even fish. It’s a system that works for both producers and consumers. Here are some of our favorite examples.

Passerine Stops in Urbana on Third U.S. Tour

On Tuesday, Aug. 5, Florida folk and Americana band Passerine lands in Urbana, IL, to perform at the Urbana-Champaign Independent Media Center. Show starts at 7:30pm. Admission is $5-10 sliding scale.

Who Gets to Decide What a City Can Do with Broadband Internet?

While our local municipal boradband was sold off under questionable circumstances with hardly a whimper, the decision was made in part because of the weak hand local governments hold in bringing efficient, low cost services to residents. It was a decision we will come to regret.

Unfortunately, Congressional Republicans and some states want to control local affairs

by Jay Walljasper

“(W)ithout power and independence, a town may contain good subjects, but it can have no active citizens.”  That was the conclusion of Alexis de Tocqueville after touring a youthful American Republic in the early 1830s, as recorded in his classic Democracy in America. Today we are engaged in a renewed debate about the authority of governments closest to the people.

On July 16, by a vote of 223-200 the House of Representatives voted to strip the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) of the authority to allow communities the right to determine their broadband futures.  Republicans voted 221-4 in favor.

Neutrality Begins At Home: What U.S. Mayors Can Do Right Now to Support a Neutral Internet

by April Glaser and Corynne McSherry

Photo: Free Press/ cc/ Flickr

This weekend at the U.S. Conference of Mayors annual meeting in Dallas, some mayors will take a strong stand in support of net neutrality. According to an op-ed by Mayors Ed Lee of San Francisco and Ed Murray of Seattle, the city leaders are unveiling a resolution calling on the FCC to preserve an open Internet.

In Harm's Way: The Dangers of a World Without Net Neutrality

by April Glaser

Last month the FCC released its proposal for America’s new network neutrality rules. Unfortunately, the agency’s proposal included rules that would permit Internet providers to prioritize certain websites, e.g., make deals with some services for a faster and better path to subscribers. While the FCC claims it is not endorsing such deals, the proposed rules will inevitably be read as exactly that.

The parties most threatened by this kind of network discrimination are those who are trying to make novel and unanticipated uses of the network and who cannot afford payola

Protest Music and People Movements: The Tradition Continues

by Peter Dreier and Dick Flacks

In the most recent Coen brothers film, Inside Llewyn Davis, the protagonist -- a struggling Greenwich Village folksinger in 1961 -- is based, very loosely, on Dave Van Ronk, a little-known (outside folk music circles) but influential folk-singer who helped define the folk music revival of the late fifties, and mentored the young Bob Dylan and others during the early 1960s when what Van Ronk called the "great folk scare" took off. To understand the atmosphere of that music scene, the Coens relied on Van Ronk's memoir (coauthored with Elijah Wald), The Mayor of McDougall Street. Van Ronk recounts his serious involvement with various left-wing factions of the period.

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